Travel & Street

I'm a photographer and this is my side blog... check out my main blog to see my work: http://bttravels.tumblr.com/

bobbycaputo:

What the World Looks Like From the Cockpit

For most photographers, making a great shot requires a quick, coordinated burst of framing, focusing, and exposing. But for aerial photographer Alex MacLean, that synchronization also includes making sure his airplane is flying steady. “It’s a lot easier than trying to take pictures out of a car because you’re dealing in 3-D space. The plane will fly itself straight and level. That’s even without autopilot,” he said. “I usually set myself up, pick up the camera for five or 10 seconds, and take the picture out an open window.”

The exhibition “Alex MacLean: Aerial Perspectives” at London’s Beetles and Huxley celebrates more than 30 years of MacLean’s work. MacLean’s career in photography began in 1975, when he got his pilot’s license after graduating from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. While flying his Cessna 172, he started taking photos of architectural and landscape design, which he sold to universities for research purposes. Eventually, he formed his own photographycompany and assembled a roster of municipal, institutional, corporate, and private clients.

(Continue Reading)

dig-image:

Daido Moriyama

dig-image:

Daido Moriyama

"Photographs are the footprints of light and memory, photographs are the history of memory. The myth of the light."

— Daido Moriyama (via kinyoubi)

lehroi:

Josef Hoflehner

1- Bondi Baths (Sydney, Australia, 2011).

2- Playa Azul (Cuba, 2012).

3- Waikiki Surfers (Honolulu, Hawaii, 2013).

4- Surfers (Hawaii, 2013).

5- Waikiki (Honolulu, Hawaii, 2013).

6- Santa Monica (California, 2013).

(Source: jemeos, via kuramaa)

scotthwilson:

Parc Omega, Montebello, QC

imaphotoeditor:

“The crushing force of time is before my eyes, and I myself try to keep pressing the shutter release of the camera. In this inevitable race between the two of us, I feel I am going to be burnt up.” – Daido Moriyama

Opening Next Week! 

Daido Moriyama at Steven Kasher Gallery

521 West 23rd st. nyc

 

slushy:

In 1972 Daido Moriyama first published what would eventually be enshrined as a classic of photographic books, albeit one that, like all such modernist classics, must have seemed an abomination at the time. It was originally titled Bye Bye Photography Dear, and its pages were a direct assault on all the preciousness of American and European paradigms of the form. The images were rampantly blurred, grainy, scratched, and often just muddled shades of gray. The compositions were negligible, if they could be called compositions at all. Moriyama’s pictorial choices seemed to have been made completely at random, and the reproductions often included the sprocket holes at the negatives’ edges, like a film gone completely off its track.

Moriyama’s own recollection of the project contextualizes it best as the timely product of a turbulent and revolutionary-minded period: “Perhaps the authority of the failed negative, with all its inherent possibility, could be restored. I imagined I could construct a book — a book of pure sensations without meaning — by shuffling into a harmonious whole a series of childish images.”

Now reissued for the first time in his own country, a new edition bears some slight changes befitting its slightly more ceremonial revised name. Farewell Photography is a bit larger than its predecessor, with a cleaned-up white cover and matching slipcase to boot. None of the original negatives or prints exist, so reproductions were made directly from the first book, though, curiously, the contrast was “corrected,” yielding much crisper images in full tones of black-and-white. There is no text whatsoever, and the pictures run bleed edge to bleed edge throughout, like a controlled detonation between covers.

With thirty-five years’ hindsight, it’s easy to see the book as the spiritual godfather of the garage-band aesthetic that dominated commercial design in the eighties and nineties, typified by Raygun magazine and4AD Records. The visual aesthetic of punk owes Moriyama a debt, as does every art school naïf who has ever taken it upon himself to boil his negatives; piss in the developer tray; mangle, staple, and tear at his prints; or otherwise molest the mechanics of the medium to achieve what by now are fairly standard results.

Moriyama, of course, has his own distant roots in the avant-garde precedents of collage, Dada, Pop, and so on, but the one aspect intrinsic to his work that should be recognized is its status as a unique reflection of Japanese culture and history. Moriyama’s relation to the Provoke and Gutai groups (the latter having disbanded the same year as Bye Bye was originally published), and his influence on today’s artists abasing themselves in otaku ironies, unmistakably phrase his work as a shattered and horrified response to a postwar landscape laid literally and spiritually bare.

(Source: gilblank.com)

umq:

Landscape {Elizabeth Gadd}{Tumblr}

skyiswomb:

Alberta and British Columbia, Canada - film

It’s my 3000th post, meaning I’ve posted a crazy amount of photos since I’ve started on tumblr. This community is insanely inspiring, and I’ve connected with a lot of cool people through it. I follow some incredibly talented people and with that said, I’d just like to say thanks to everyone.
Hopefully I’ll get the chance to meet, explore, and shoot with more of you in the future.

(Source: carsonreneau)